Candidate profiles for Congress

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Brittney Lofthouse – Contributing Writer

The Constitution does not require candidates for Congress to live in the district they want to represent, so when North Carolina’s Rep. Mark Meadows announced he wouldn’t be seeking office, Republicans from across the state filed for office — the farthest from District 11 being Albert Wiley Jr., who lives on the coast. The following are those candidates who responded to the questionnaire.

Chuck Archerd

Chuck Archerd
Chuck Archerd refers to himself as a committed Christian, who accepted Christ as his Savior more than 40 years ago. As he has followed Him, he has taught Sunday school, led community and Sunday school groups, served as an Elder and Deacon and shared his faith on several disaster relief mission trips.
Archerd and his wife, Anne, have been married for 37 years and raised four daughters while living in Asheville for the past 22 years.
Archerd worked his way through school earning a BSBA in Accounting from University of Florida, MBA from Southern Methodist University, practiced as a CPA with Price Waterhouse and was the managing partner of a local Asheville CPA firm. He has successfully started several small businesses including founding and leading a real estate investment company since 2001. He has created jobs, managed budgets, been accountable to his partners and investors.
“I am a political outsider who will answer first to my Lord and then to the citizens of the 11th District,” said Archerd. “I will make decisions based on a foundation of conservative beliefs, 40 years of business experience, and love of our country. I will defend the Constitution. I will not bend to the political establishment but always be accountable to our friends, neighbors and citizens in the 11th District. I have a fire in my belly and a history of hard work. I will take these attributes to Washington intent on making a difference; then I will come back to the place I call home – Western North Carolina. I do not view serving in Congress as a career; but, as a serious responsibility, honor and duty.”
Do you live within District 11? Do you think it is important to live within the District you are trying to represent?
“Yes – Buncombe County for the past 22-plus years,” said Archerd. “Yes, this is very important, if you don’t know the people, how can you represent them?”
What do you see as being the biggest issue facing District 11 and how would you address it if elected?
“Immigration and Border Security – I will be a warrior with President Trump to secure our borders, stop the flow of illegal immigrants, end catch and release,” said Archerd. “I will draft new laws to end sanctuary cities and require cooperation of local and state law enforcement with ICE.”
For residents of Macon County, it’s status quo for leaders to forget about our small community. If elected to Congress, how do you plan to be a voice for the entire district, even the small western-most counties like Macon?
“As your representative to the People’s House (US House of Representatives) I will have a continual presence in the 11th District including Macon County,” said Archerd. “We will also develop ways to open communications with the rural areas to ensure that their voices are heard.”
What is your stance on marijuana legalization?
“No do not believe that marijuana is beneficial to our society and should not be legalized,” said Archerd.
Any other issues or information you would like your voters to know?
“Moral values – Our world is upside down right now; we are in a battle of good versus evil,” said Archerd. “I will fight for the rule of law, defend our gun rights and stand for our pro-life and pro-family values.”

Madison Cawthorn
Madison Cawthorn
Madison Cawthorn is an 8th generation resident of North Carolina’s 11th Congressional district. His ancestors have served Western North Carolina communities for more than 200 years including in the Revolutionary War.
Cawthorn was homeschooled in Hendersonville and was nominated to the U.S. Naval Academy by Rep. Mark Meadows in 2014. However, Cawthorn’s plans were derailed that year after he nearly died in a tragic automobile accident that left him partially paralyzed and in a wheelchair. Cawthorn’s ordeal built his faith, made him a fighter, helped him appreciate every day, and inspired him to help everyone he encounters overcome whatever adversity they face in their daily lives.
Today, Cawthorn is a small businessman. He is the owner and CEO of a real estate investment company. Cawthorn is also a motivational speaker. He challenges people across the nation to have faith, work hard, play by the rules and pursue the American dream.
A constitutional conservative, Cawthorn is committed to defending the values of faith, family and the freedom that have made America great. Cawthorn attends Biltmore Church in Hendersonville. He enjoys hunting, cooking, travel, fitness, photography and videography, and studying history. He is engaged to be married to Cristina Bayardelle.
“I am running for Congress for three main reasons,” said Cawthorn. “First, we need term limits on Congress so that there is incentive within the House. More will be accomplished if there are term limits. Second, we need a balanced budget amendment. It is immoral to place this kind of debt upon ourselves and the upcoming generations. The third and most important reason is that we have to combat the rise of Socialism in this country.”
Do you live within District 11? Do you think it is important to live within the District you are trying to represent?
“I grew up and live in the 11th district,” said Cawthorn. “This is my home. You shouldn’t be allowed to represent the district if you don’t live in it. How do you know what’s best for the district if you don’t even live there.”
What do you see as being the biggest issue facing District 11 and how would you address it if elected?
No response from the candidate.
For residents of Macon County, it’s status quo for leaders to forget about our small community. If elected to Congress, how do you plan to be a voice for the entire district, even the small western-most counties like Macon?
“When someone is elected, it is their duty to represent each resident of the district,” said Cawthron. “It is most important to stay in touch with all communities and people of the district.”
What is your stance on marijuana legalization?
No response from the candidate.
Any other issues or information you would like your voters to know?
“I’m a fighter who has overcome great adversity, and I believe America is worth fighting for!” said Cawthron. “Check out my website to find out more about who I am and what I believe.”
Jim Davis
Jim Davis
James (Jim) Wayland Davis, 73, has been married to his wife Judith since 1972. Together they have two sons, Jeff Davis, 43, (wife Rebecca and daughters Carly and Megan), and Joshua Davis, 42. Davis earned a BA in Biology in 1969 from Southern Adventist University; DDS 1974 Loma Linda University School of Dentistry; MS Orthodontics 1989 Loma Linda University Graduate School. He practiced general dentistry from 1974-1986 in Franklin, NC and practiced orthodontics from 1989- present in Franklin.
Davis served on the Macon County Board of Commissioners from 1996-2000 and from 2004-2010. He has served in NC Senate District 50 since 2011. In the Senate, Davis has served as the Chairman Joint Legislative Committee Transportation Appropriations; Chairman Senate Transportation Policy Committee; Member Senate Finance, Health Care, and Judiciary Committees; Member Appropriations/Base Budget
“I am running to continue my public service to the citizens of western North Carolina,” said Davis.
Do you live within District 11? Do you think it is important to live within the District you are trying to represent?
“I have lived in the district for the past 45 years except when attending graduate school from 1987-89,” said Davis. “I do not understand how anyone who does not live in the district can claim to know the citizens and their needs.”
What do you see as being the biggest issue facing District 11 and how would you address it if elected?
“The biggest issue in District 11 is the availability of well paying jobs with good benefits,” said Davis. “I would advocate for continued tax and regulatory reform to incentivize the continued creation of those jobs.”
For residents of Macon County, its status quo for leaders to forget about our small community. If elected to Congress, how do you plan to be a voice for the entire district, even the small western-most counties like Macon?
“During my public service I have remained a champion of local government so I challenge your assertion that it is “status quo” for leaders to forget about small communities,” said Davis. “I will never forget from whence I came.”
What is your stance on marijuana legalization?
“I am opposed to the legalization of recreational marijuana,” said Davis. “Recent scientific studies have shown how harmful its use is to adolescents. I voted for the the limited medical marijuana law passed by the North Carolina legislature in 2015.”
Any other issues or information you would like your voters to know?
“I am the only candidate in the race who has served in elected office,” said Davis. “Consequently, I have a 19-year record for folks to examine. Should voters give me the privilege of continuing my public service they have ample evidence on which to base their opinion.”

Dan Driscoll

Dan Driscoll
Dan Driscoll is a third-generation combat veteran and spent much of his childhood in Banner Elk. He attended Appalachian Christian School and Watauga High School where he met his high school sweetheart, Cassie, who is now his wife. They have two kids, Daniel Jr., 4, and Lila, 2.
Driscoll graduated from UNC and joined the U.S. Army. After completing officer candidate school and graduating from Ranger School, he joined the 10th Mountain Light Infantry Division in Fort Drum, N.Y., where he served as a Cavalry Scout Platoon Leader for the next two years. Driscoll was deployed to Iraq in 2009.
Upon returning from Iraq, he enrolled at Yale Law School on the GI Bill. During his time at law school, he felt called to serve the veteran population. Driscoll worked for Yale’s Veterans Legal Services Clinic, providing free legal counsel to veterans of our nation’s wars. After graduating he felt the pull to go home, to return to where he was raised, and make a difference for those around him.
Since returning to North Carolina, Driscoll has been working for an investment firm that helps build small businesses across the state. He has been involved in the creation of new jobs across North Carolina, including his latest project opening a new home maintenance business in Hendersonville.
“I’m a third-generation wartime veteran,” said Driscoll. “This upbringing instilled in me a focus on hard work and a love of country. While a freshman at UNC, with the country in the throes of the War on Terror, I gave up the typical college experience so I could enlist in the military as quickly as possible. That military experience cemented in me the desire to live a life of public service. With the country at another tremendous crossroads, it feels like now is the time to serve again. As a small business owner in North Carolina, I know first-hand the struggles of creating a business in the current regulatory environment. I believe that a pro-business environment and well-trained citizenry creates more stable, higher paying jobs, and I’ll advocate for both. Additionally, the infrastructure in rural America generally, and the NC-11 specifically, is in massive need of an upgrade. We are not well prepared for the tectonic changes that are coming with advancing technology. This weak infrastructure is significantly hindering the ability of many Americans to start and grow businesses. I’m passionate about helping bring federal spending and innovation to these areas.”
Do you live within District 11? Do you think it is important to live within the District you are trying to represent?
“My wife and I grew up in western North Carolina, and I recently moved to Buncombe County,” said Driscoll. “Since leaving to serve in the Army, I’ve had a number of addresses but am happy to be back where my wife I are excited to raise our children in the community that raised us. I do believe that it is important that you live within the district you represent, as I believe the mountain values of hard work, faith and family are important when representing the families of this district.”
What do you see as being the biggest issue facing District 11 and how would you address it if elected?
“I know first-hand the struggles of creating a business in the current regulatory environment,” said Driscoll. “I believe that a pro-business environment and well-trained citizenry creates more stable, higher paying jobs. I’m passionate about helping bring federal spending and innovation to this area.”
For residents of Macon County, its status quo for leaders to forget about our small community. If elected to Congress, how do you plan to be a voice for the entire district, even the small western-most counties like Macon?
“Frequently, candidates say one thing to get elected and then do anther once in congress,” said Driscoll. “The Army Ranger Creed talks about leaving no man behind. As your Congressman, I will aspire to that same level of commitment to all my constituents.”
What is your stance on marijuana legalization?
“I stand with President Trump and agree that it is a state issue,” said Driscoll.
Any other issues or information you would like your voters to know?
“I’ll never forget the first words out of my platoon sergeant’s mouth when we first met: “Sir, they will never care what you know until they know that you care.” Fresh out of initial training, I didn’t know how to respond, or, really, what he meant. I knew from my Army training that my and my non-commissioned officers’ efforts to tactically prepare our unit would have a meaningful impact on our ability to complete our mission—and would be critical to bringing everyone home,” said Driscoll. “My platoon sergeant’s advice has since become the single most powerful bit of leadership wisdom in my life, one that has influenced virtually every decision I made as a platoon leader and, later, as a business owner. Although it’s been more than a decade since that first meeting between a seasoned platoon sergeant and me, a fresh lieutenant, I hear his voice in my ear daily: to me, serving with honor means working every day to show your family, friends, co-workers and constituents that you care before anything else. And, as I found in the Army and afterward, you cannot show those you represent you care if they and their welfare aren’t above your own.”

Wayne King

Wayne King
Wayne King, 39, has one son, Noah, 11. He served as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Congressman Mark Meadows’ office for the last seven years. He has supervised the entire NC11 district team who helps constituents on a day to day basis with issues involving the federal government. King previously was the elected vice-chairman of the N.C. Republican Party during the 2012 election cycle.
“I am running for Congress because I love Western North Carolina, our state, and our great nation, because I believe we need more strong conservatives in Congress who will stand and defend President Trump, and because I am gravely concerned that our Constitution, our freedoms, our values and our way of life are under attack,” said King. “I believe the people of WNC deserve a Congressman who is a fighter and who has proven that they have the experience and the ability to get the job done. Anyone who knows me well knows that I am a fighter, that I will always stand up for what is right, and that I won’t back down. My track record from my seven years serving as Deputy Chief of Staff and District Director to Congressman Meadows shows that I have the experience and ability to get the job done for the 11th District and for our nation.
Do you live within District 11? Do you think it is important to live within the District you are trying to represent?
“I think it is essential that the person elected to represent the 11th District in Congress have a clear understanding of the values of the people across the district and the understanding of the unique challenges and issues facing each of the 17 counties,” said King. “I also think it is essential that they have strong existing relationships across all 17 counties. I have spent the last seven-plus years either working in District 11 as Deputy Chief of Staff and District Director or, since December, as a Republican candidate for Congress. During this time I’ve traveled nearly every inch of this district meeting with law enforcement, veterans, ministers, farmers, elected officials, business owners, retirees, blue collar workers, and just every day regular people. I’ve solved problems, big and small, for people, businesses, and local governments across the district. I’ve built relationships with key stakeholders from one end of the district to the other. I’m also a proud native of Western North Carolina. While I don’t presently live in the district, there is no one running for this office that has spent more time traveling this district this district than I have over the last seven years, and no one that has a deeper understanding, appreciation, and knowledge of all 17 counties.
What do you see as being the biggest issue facing District 11 and how would you address it if elected?
“The biggest issue facing the 11th District and our country is that our values and our freedoms, the very principles our country were founded on, are un der attack,” said King. “Eroding our rights and freedoms are not the answer. Socialism is not the answer. I will solve this by standing up for our Constitution and fighting to preserve our freedoms and values. I will always stand up for what is right, and I won’t back down. I believe in America and the American people. If we stay true to the principles our country was founded on our best days are still in front of us.”
For residents of Macon County, it’s status quo for leaders to forget about our small community. If elected to Congress, how do you plan to be a voice for the entire district, even the small western-most counties like Macon?
“During my seven years as District Director and Chief of Staff for Congressman Meadows, I made an effort to regularly travel the entire district, to spend meaningful time in every county, to develop a relationship with elected officials and business and community leaders in every county, and to ensure that unique issues and challenges facing each county were dealt with quickly and fairly no matter the size of the county,” said King. “As your Congressman, I will do the same. You will see me and my staff on a regular basis in Macon County and you will never feel forgotten or left out. I will strive to be both the most accessible and the most visible Congressman Macon County has ever had.”
What is your stance on marijuana legalization?
“I am opposed to marijuana legalization,” said King.
Any other issues or information you would like your voters to know?
“In Congress, I will continue stand with President Trump, defend him from both the left and “Never Trump” Republicans, and work hand-in-hand with our president to Keep America Great,” said King. “While ‘Never Trump’ Republicans including some who pretend to support him now, refused to support President Trump against Hillary Clinton, I travelled across our state campaigning for and with President Trump, and since he’s been elected I’ve consistently been a strong voice defending our president and working to ensure his agenda and his vision for our nation become reality.”
Lynda Bennett, Steven Fekete Jr., Dillon Gentry, Joey Osborne, Vance Patterson, and Albert Wiley Jr. were either unable to be reached as of press time or did not return candidate profile questionnaire. Can

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