Franklin’s registered voters admonished to exercise their right to vote

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Brittney Lofthouse –  Contributing Writer

Voter turnout in Franklin was less than ideal for the 2017 municipal election, and if early voting numbers are any indication, that trend is likely to repeat itself this election cycle despite having a variety of candidates to choose from. 

During the 2017 election, 3,993 residents were recorded as living in the town of Franklin, 2,655 of which were registered to vote. In early voting, only 183 cast ballots on Election Day, while another 194 people voted early, meaning only 377 of the town’s 2,655 voters showed up at the polls.

“Being able to vote is an awesome privilege and responsibility that we tend to take for granted,” said Franklin Town Council Incumbent Brandon McMahan. McMahan appears on the ballot this election as he is seeking re-election to the town council. “Even at the local level, the decisions made by the town council and mayor, affect everyone who lives in town, and people who are able, need to exercise the right to choose who is making those decisions.”

As of Monday night, a total of 252 people had cast their ballots for the municipal elections. However, that number includes voters for both the Highlands and Franklin locations, which isn’t currently broken down beyond voting location. Official election results will show how many of those votes were for the Highlands Municipal Election and how many can actually be attributed to the Franklin area race. 

“Democracy dies when people are apathetic and do not vote,” said Mayoral candidate Bob Scott. “Your ballot is how you express your concern about the people who are in the position to spend your tax dollars.  The bottom line is, do you really have a right to complain when you give up your chance to have a say in who will be spending your money and providing you with town services by not voting?”

One surprising statistic in the voting totals is the split between party votes. While 86 Democrats have voted and 91 Republicans have voted, unaffiliated voters also account for 75 votes during the early voting process. 

“Well, there’s no state, federal or other local races this election cycle to draw people out to the polls, so it’s really important that everyone who is registered and lives in town gets out to vote and lets their voices be heard on how they want the future of Franklin to proceed,” said Mike Lewis, candidate for the Franklin Town Council. “Voting is a sacred franchise, a right that we should never take for granted-whether it be a national election or voting to elect leaders for our town.”

The Franklin Mayor Race features two candidates, Mayoral Incumbent Bob Scott and challenger Barbara McRae, who currently serves on the town council. 

Two candidates for town council, Kevin Klatt and Daniel Coates, who appear on the ballot, had previously expressed to the Board of Elections their desire to drop out of the race, however, ballots had already been printed so their names still appear on the ballot. Remaining candidates for the three open seats in Franklin include  incumbents Joe Collins and Brandon McMahan as well as challengers Mike Lewis, Jack Horton, Peter Mosco, and T.J. Wright. Dinah Mashburn also appears on the ballot but is running uncontested to retain her seat on the town council. 

“It is vitally important that we as citizens of Franklin take the time to vote this year,” said Franklin Town Council candidate Jack Horton.”It is not only our right but our responsibility. Good government is dependent on citizen participation. If we fail to vote when we have the opportunity, and then complain about the decisions made by our elected officials, we can only blame ourselves for not having enough interest in the future of our town to take a few minutes to let our voices be heard. North Carolina enjoys a national reputation of having good, responsible local town and county governments.  We can live up to that honor if we continue to do our part. Don’t take it for granted, exercise your right; please vote this year.”

One stop early voting runs through Friday, Nov. 1, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday; no Saturday voting. Votes can be cast at the Robert C. Carpenter Community Building on the Georgia Road or at the Highlands Civic Center until 6 p.m. on Friday. 

Election Day Voting will open at 6:30 a.m. on Nov. 5 and close at 7:30 p.m.  In Franklin, Election Day voting will be held at the Franklin Town Hall while in Highlands, voting will continue at the civic center. 

Brittney Lofthouse –  Contributing Writer

Voter turnout in Franklin was less than ideal for the 2017 municipal election, and if early voting numbers are any indication, that trend is likely to repeat itself this election cycle despite having a variety of candidates to choose from. 

During the 2017 election, 3,993 residents were recorded as living in the town of Franklin, 2,655 of which were registered to vote. In early voting, only 183 cast ballots on Election Day, while another 194 people voted early, meaning only 377 of the town’s 2,655 voters showed up at the polls.

“Being able to vote is an awesome privilege and responsibility that we tend to take for granted,” said Franklin Town Council Incumbent Brandon McMahan. McMahan appears on the ballot this election as he is seeking re-election to the town council. “Even at the local level, the decisions made by the town council and mayor, affect everyone who lives in town, and people who are able, need to exercise the right to choose who is making those decisions.”

As of Monday night, a total of 252 people had cast their ballots for the municipal elections. However, that number includes voters for both the Highlands and Franklin locations, which isn’t currently broken down beyond voting location. Official election results will show how many of those votes were for the Highlands Municipal Election and how many can actually be attributed to the Franklin area race. 

“Democracy dies when people are apathetic and do not vote,” said Mayoral candidate Bob Scott. “Your ballot is how you express your concern about the people who are in the position to spend your tax dollars.  The bottom line is, do you really have a right to complain when you give up your chance to have a say in who will be spending your money and providing you with town services by not voting?”

One surprising statistic in the voting totals is the split between party votes. While 86 Democrats have voted and 91 Republicans have voted, unaffiliated voters also account for 75 votes during the early voting process. 

“Well, there’s no state, federal or other local races this election cycle to draw people out to the polls, so it’s really important that everyone who is registered and lives in town gets out to vote and lets their voices be heard on how they want the future of Franklin to proceed,” said Mike Lewis, candidate for the Franklin Town Council. “Voting is a sacred franchise, a right that we should never take for granted-whether it be a national election or voting to elect leaders for our town.”

The Franklin Mayor Race features two candidates, Mayoral Incumbent Bob Scott and challenger Barbara McRae, who currently serves on the town council. 

Two candidates for town council, Kevin Klatt and Daniel Coates, who appear on the ballot, had previously expressed to the Board of Elections their desire to drop out of the race, however, ballots had already been printed so their names still appear on the ballot. Remaining candidates for the three open seats in Franklin include  incumbents Joe Collins and Brandon McMahan as well as challengers Mike Lewis, Jack Horton, Peter Mosco, and T.J. Wright. Dinah Mashburn also appears on the ballot but is running uncontested to retain her seat on the town council. 

“It is vitally important that we as citizens of Franklin take the time to vote this year,” said Franklin Town Council candidate Jack Horton.”It is not only our right but our responsibility. Good government is dependent on citizen participation. If we fail to vote when we have the opportunity, and then complain about the decisions made by our elected officials, we can only blame ourselves for not having enough interest in the future of our town to take a few minutes to let our voices be heard. North Carolina enjoys a national reputation of having good, responsible local town and county governments.  We can live up to that honor if we continue to do our part. Don’t take it for granted, exercise your right; please vote this year.”

One stop early voting runs through Friday, Nov. 1, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday; no Saturday voting. Votes can be cast at the Robert C. Carpenter Community Building on the Georgia Road or at the Highlands Civic Center until 6 p.m. on Friday. 

Election Day Voting will open at 6:30 a.m. on Nov. 5 and close at 7:30 p.m.  In Franklin, Election Day voting will be held at the Franklin Town Hall while in Highlands, voting will continue at the civic center. 

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