Letters to the Editor for August 18

0

Thoughts on recent letters to the editor 

I enjoy reading your publication and having access to all your fine advertisers. The most enjoyable part of any newspaper, in my estimation, is the letters to the editor.

This publication’s willingness to publish such a diverse range of opinions is outstanding.

My, my, my, Trump a fascist? Mr. Trump’s inept handling of the Bengazi fiasco, that cost the lives of four Americans and the coverup told to those Gold Star families. Pardon me, I mean the Hillary Clinton fiasco!

Her meeting with Black Lives Matter, her lying about her secret emails, speaking to multinational companies for exorbitant speaking fees, the meeting of Bill and Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Rosatom’s uranium secret Russian deal to buy 20 percent of U.S.-owned uranium reserves, signed off by Sec. of State Clinton; the list goes on and on. Now who is the money, power hungry fascist, Trump or Clinton?

As a Florida-licensed concealed weapons permitee, I have passed a rigorous background check. The last time I checked there were 30-plus states who shared each other’s concealed weapons permits “reciprocity.”

There is a huge difference between open carry and concealed carry. I can encounter legal penalties if my concealed weapons inadvertently become exposed.

I am prohibited from carrying in places of nuisances, federal buildings, post offices, city, county, state and federal courthouses, and other places where posted. Ignorance of the statutes is at my peril.

Perhaps advertisers Rob Hayles [or Jim Sottile], professionals in concealed carry chould inform the public of the basis of handgun carry laws. This would go a long way to clarify any misconception an uniformed and/or misinformed public may have.

Philip Powell — Highlands, N.C.

Experiencing the Mountain Blooming Garden Tour 

The man with a twinkle in his eye helped me onto the tour bus and gave me a clue that I was in for quite a ride. He informed me that I would enjoy the ride as the driver was in the Witness Protection Program, but he could be trusted.

The driver looked at me and said, “he is always like this.”

I looked at both of them and declared that, “they would both be trouble (cleaned up my words) when they got sent to the nursing home.” I threatened them both with my slender mountain cut walking stick and promised them both a threshing if they did not behave.

Twinkling eye informed me that, “his wife was not putting him in non nursing home, but would put him in a north-facing canoe with a bottle of whiskey and send him down the Cullasaja.”

So off we went, me naming flora and fauna to the paying guests and the driver asking me questions on how to fertilize his oncoming berry patch. “Lots of Black Kow compost over all important plants in the fall so that the plants would soak it all in by spring,” was my reply.

Very narrow, leafy, turning roads with an occasional black arrow on white paper began guiding us into a deep wilderness. My usual keen sense of direction totally failed. I had to trust the “witness protection man.”

The next few hours left an impression on me that I will not soon forget.

Incredibly wealthy people had spent great sums of their substance to blast out great pieces of stone on which to build their craggy nests. They craved to see the mountains piled on each other as far as the eye could see. These places were so remote and unattainable that only the early hunters and trappers would have ever been allowed to see such views and know that they exist.

Outside one homestead lay a sheer slice of rock thousands of feet wide and just as deep with only the fringes of evergreens to give perspective.

Here, nature forces man to be humble and respectful as he feels helpless against the brutal totality of the rock.

On that same site, one found niches and crevices of rich dirt abounding with cultivated flowers and herbs all expertly staged and planted to impress one with their perfection. Dinner plate dahlias with their many colors demanding the mountain mists to bathe them into perfect bloom. Dahlias always grow best in the mountains but they must be dug before killing frosts.

After enduring the swelter of the Chattahoochee basin in Georgia, I have observed that flowers blooming in the cool mountains are more intense in color and longevity.

My Georgia day lilies have such a short bloom life that I don’t bother to grow them, while I grow a spectacular clump of orange Tiger lilies in Franklin that lasts for several weeks.

Somewhere along the tour, I became the “lady in the long blue dress.” I foolishly wore it to be “a right proper lady with an umbrella” but the dress made me cumbersome getting in and out of the beefy vans … but many hands were there to help me and I heard some whisper, “she knows garden stuff.”

To my surprise, there was a lady waiting for me in the very beautiful Rosemary Verey designed garden at the last spectacular house. She told me that I might be the only one who could name a mystery plant and so I did. I told her that it was very ancient medieval medicinal herb even mentioned in the Bible called Betony. I use it in many of my gardens because the deer will not eat it; it is evergreen; and once a year, it shoots up pretty blue/purple bottle brush flowers. In this the garden it was in full bloom.

I try to catch this garden tour  each year that it is offered in order to find new hardy plants for my own gardens and observe building techniques. I am never disappointed. I found no new flowers that I could use or attempt to grow in my gardens and so I turn to the ever-pleasing crocosmia (crow-cozz-me-uh) a Native American sound but it is not. The leaves look like thin iris leaves with tips of fiery red small flowers bursting out like firecrackers. Plant them in the spring for next year’s bloom (small button bulbs) in full sun. Divide in three/four years.

Save your money for it is not cheap to be assisted by Twinkling Eye and driven by Witness Protection Man but they will take you to an earthly paradise.

Shirley Cole — Franklin, N.C.

Aren’t we still in America? 

I watched the Republican Convention this past week. I am a Democrat for many years. As a union official the Democrats were our friends, if you know what I mean. After watching the convention, I liked what Trump said.

I supported Slick Willy Clinton for president and voted for him and Hillary. I didn’t really like it but I figured with Bill there what could go wrong. Wrong! All it did was give us eight lousy years of Obama and Hillary with poor leadership. Now, here she comes again. Come on people, not this time.

I was sitting here Saturday watching TV, and here comes Hillary and her pick for V.P., making a speech in Miami, Fla. I guess she was introducing the V.P. when he started to speak. Wow! I thought I was on a Spanish station but no, we are in Miami. I thought the people were Americans in Miami.

When my grandparents came from Sicily, to get citizenship, they had to learn to speak English. My grandpop would raise hell with Grandma if she spoke Italian to the kids. He would say, “In this country you speak American.” To have Hillary’s V.P. make a speech in Spanish isn’t proper. I wonder if they will speak Italian in my old part of Brooklyn? Well, voters, they are playing the race card over and over. I am sure those people in Miami are here long enough to understand English.

Well, enough is enough. This old Democrat will cross over and vote for Donald Trump the next president of this wonderful country called America.

By the way, the V.P. Slippery Hillary picked as her running mate, isn’t he the guy accused of misusing funds for personal use? Oh well, birds of a feather stick together?

I urge all smart Democrats to wake up and dump Slippery Hillary and vote for a new beginning, a man named Donald Trump, our next president of the United States. By the way, he speaks English.

William Trapani — Franklin, N.C.

‘Trickle-down’ just doesn’t work 

You may have noticed that we have an election coming up.  With that, one hot topic will be taxes.  Based on their stubborn belief in trickle-down economics, most Republican politicians will continue to tell you that tax cuts are the solution to most of your problems.

The story goes that if you cut taxes on higher income groups, investors will have more money to invest which will provide money to companies to build more facilities which will hire more people who will pay more in taxes and ultimately result in increased government revenue.

We have been testing this theory for over 30 years and the results are in.  It doesn’t work!

The Reagan tax cuts resulted in unprecedented increases in the deficit and during his eight years in office.  The tax cuts and relaxed financial oversight during Bush 2 led to the next great increase in national debt, middle class bankruptcies and an international financial crisis.  Only recently has the increase in annual deficit spending been reversed as we slowly emerge from the Bush Recession.

At the state level, Kansas and Louisiana have become the poster children for aggressive implementation of trickle-down.  Both are economic train wrecks.  The deep red Kansas legislature even debated whether to ignore a valid ruling from their own Supreme Court regarding education funding rather than deal with the real cause of their budget disaster.  Kansans threw out many of their trickle-down legislators in the recent primary.

So why hasn’t this worked?  Nationally, we now have a concentration of wealth in the upper one percent that has not been seen since just before the Great Depression of the 1930s. The last 20 years have seen the greatest transfer of wealth in U.S. history.  Large corporations are sitting on record amounts of cash and buying other companies – not investing in new production capacity that would create jobs.

Why is this?  We are a consumer economy and the vast majority of consumers – the middle and lower economic classes – don’t have extra money to spend after paying for food and shelter.  Companies will not invest in new production and employees if they don’t see an expanding market for their products. That market has been eliminated by implementation of trickle-down tax policies.  The problem is made worse when legislatures use increased sales taxes to balance budgets.  Sales taxes hit middle and lower income citizens worse than the wealthy.  In North Carolina the vast majority of us pay more of our income in taxes (income and sales) than we did before Governor McCrory and Senator Davis took charge.

The trickle-down theory has been tested for over 30 years and has been found to be not only false, but dangerous.  It’s time to move on and develop policies that invest in the 99 percent of citizens.  Trickle-down just doesn’t work.

John Gladden — Franklin, N.C.

High corporate tax rates hinder economic growth 

Economics is a fascinating study and it’s a shame more people, especially our young, know little or nothing about the subject.  Too many of our young people think that money is grown on a government tree somewhere “out there.”

I listened carefully to Donald Trump’s speech in Detroit explain his economic plan to get our economy rolling again.

Currently, our economy is growing at the rate of 1.2% at a time when Ireland’s economy is growing at the rate of 27% and China’s economy has a 7% growth rate.

Trump suggested that our high corporate tax rate of 35% is causing companies to move overseas and I have suggested this a number of times in these pages. With some state taxes, companies can pay almost 50% in taxes.

Trump’s plan would lower corporate taxes to 15%.

Hillary’s view is that those evil awful companies that put people to work should be taxed and regulated out of business.

Hillary suggested that Trump was using old and outdated ideas but understand we didn’t really come out of the Great Depression until President Kennedy lowered tax rates which lead to a booming economy.

President Reagan borrowed on the idea and he also lowered taxes which actually led to a federal tax revenue increase of 8%.  Lowering taxes worked.

It’s really pretty simple and what happens when you lower taxes is the public has more spare money to spend and buy more things which stimulates the economy.  And, because people are buying more stuff, companies expand and hire more people to work.

More and more people invest their money in companies to expand even more, making a profit for the company as well as the stockholders.

Since the middle class buy a large share of those stocks, they will be financially secure when they retire.

Hillary proposes raising corporate taxes and then somehow preventing companies from moving out of the country.  Short of having the SWAT Teams confiscate a company and nationalizing it, there is nothing to stop a company from opening a small operation in a foreign country and gradually expanding there.

Not to be too critical, Hillary’s plan just doesn’t make sense and I think most knowledgeable people know that.

I later listened to Rudy Giuliani talk about when mayor of New York City, he wiped out a several billion dollar deficit and ended up with a surplus, reduced the number of people on welfare and cut the crime rate in half all because he lowered taxes which spurred growth that provided jobs.

Hillary’s plan is that it is just not logical. It will raise the cost of goods to all of us and will reduce our ability to sell our exported products in a competitive overseas market. It will also force more companies overseas.   Ultimately, the working class will be the ones suffering the most, losing the higher paying jobs.

Unless we want to be a nation of hamburger flippers with PhD’s, we need to look seriously at Trump’s plan.

Donald Trump’s plan for the economy is the only one that makes sense and history tells us that it will work.

Unlike our government where making changes or corrections is all but impossible, Donald Trump will change as needed to succeed.

Bob Wilson — Franklin, N.C.

National Model Aviation Day a complete success 

Macon Aeromodelers would like to thank everyone who made this past weekend’s Air Show at OTX Aero Drome a complete success.  Perfect weather, great flying, huge crowds and great food all contributed to a record- breaking day, and we were able to make a $1,000 donation to the local Chapter of the American Legion.  We would like to personally thank Chuck St. Johns of Fat Buddies for the slaw and baked beans, Mark Pruitt, manager of the Westgate Ingles for the buns, Hickory Knoll cookers for the sauce, and Son Rise Sanitations for the Comfort Station. Considering the number of events that were going on in Franklin we were truly blessed.  Macon Aeromodelers looks forward to continually supporting our local charities in the future.

For more information, visit our website at   www.maconaeromodelers.com or Academy of Model Aeronautics web site at  www.modelaircraft.org

Greg Doster – Macon Aeromodelers

A place of emptiness in each of us 

Some time ago I came across an article and picture of the “Pale Blue Dot” which just happened to be “us,” or the view of earth some 3.7 billion miles away. If you view this you’ll find yourselves wiping your computer screens to clear any dust, because at this distance we are about the size of a sharp pencil point on a backdrop of deep dark space. The mind has difficulty in grasping just how insignificant we seem upon this little speck we call earth and home. Our world and personal problems are all but insignificant, and there seems no escape or distance great enough that can separate us from any of this, but we continue hoping otherwise. In many ways we feel small, both deep within as well as in humanity as a whole, which leads us into a vacuum which questions why we even exist?

We look for something or someone to relate to but seem un-noticed or feel no one is listening. Even in a once popular song, “One is the Loneliest Number,” and its reflection of how alone one can feel, even within a crowd of humanity and upon this small place we call earth, this penetrates the heart, soul and mind, and much of this is our own doing which causes all this uneasiness.  We try desperately to express and communicate our desires in search of significance towards something or someone who understands us. Even the closest of relationships there are times we have difficulty in expressing what’s truly on our hearts and minds, and our best chosen words seem inadequate and miss their mark. We seem to advance our personal causes through perversion, misuse and abuse of our human powers, this should make us ashamed, but we say it’s justifiable, and it’s obvious we’re adrift with little to anchor to.

Many feel humanity’s frustration of disconnect. It’s nothing new. It’s been with us since the fall of man, and separation from God. Our world is in need of something beyond the reach of any of us or any world system that is derived by man. For in every instance whatever man has gained we seem to also lose. There must be something else; it’s just we haven’t found it yet, so we keep searching and hoping, but for what?

I also hoped in what I thought myself, government, world leaders, people of power could heal personal and world problems, but as with many of us we realize this becomes futile, we make some gain in making living easier, but “living life” can become harder, emptier,  insignificant. There’s this place of emptiness in each of us, we all have it and it’s a void that seems hard to satisfy. God made us in such a way that only God can fulfill this, because he desires a relationship with each of us. Most feel we are spiritual beings within physical bodies, we sense there’s more than just the physical realm, but yet we always look for our problems to be solve in the physical, when it’s the spiritual we should  look towards. Christ died for all injustice, and all our injustice was placed upon Him. He removes the disparity and insignificance of living, and gives life a rich meaning of hope and encouragement.

“My purpose is that they may be encouraged,” Colossians 2:2.

Deni Shepard — nds13@frontier.com

SHARE
Previous articleArrest Reports for August 18
Next articleObituaries for August 18
Avatar
Free Independent Weekly Newspaper - Distributed in Franklin, Highlands, Dillsboro, Webster, Cullowhee, Scaly Mountain, N.C.; Dillard & Clayton, Ga.

LEAVE A REPLY